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How to Introduce Your Learning Disabled Child to the Creative Arts


Girls Painting and Having Fun
Photo Credit: https://www.pexels.com/@vlada-karpovich/


Parenting a child with learning disabilities has its challenges, especially when it comes to schoolwork and behavior. For many of these kids, the answer lies in finding a different approach to learning, and the arts can be a great solution. Creative learning helps empower your child by giving them a mode of self-expression and a link to more easily interact with the world around them. Courtesy of the Crooked Creek Art League, here are a few great ways you can get your child involved in the arts.


Embrace Visual Arts


One of the most beloved and accessible ways to get involved with the arts is by pursuing a visual medium, such as painting, drawing, and crafting. These kinds of activities are tactile and visually stimulating, meaning they’ll engage kids of all ages.


● The Benefits of Art for Students with Special Needs

● 10 Easy Craft Ideas for Kids With Motor Disabilities

● Visit Local Galleries and Events to Allow Kids to Engage with Art


Get Sew Creative


Sewing is a peaceful yet fun activity that even young children can do (with adult supervision, of course!). It’s a great option for kids who like creating something they can keep, and if there are older generations in your family who sew, it’s also a great bonding exercise.



Have Daily Dance Parties


Dancing is a fun activity that encourages kids to memorize moves, focus on improving their form, and stay in step with others, all of which are great skills to have both in and out of the classroom. Plus, it doubles as a great form of exercise.



Learn to Play an Instrument


Music engages various centers of the brain and can be almost therapeutic in the way it relieves stress and anxiety, conditions that many kids deal with regardless of their abilities. In addition, learning to read music is almost like learning another language, not only improving on children’s cognitive learning skills, but also giving them a self-esteem boost for translating sheet music into beautiful sounds.



Earn Some Extra Cash


Have you thought about selling the arts and crafts you make with your child? You and your child could make a little extra money on the side selling online.



No matter what form of art you introduce your child to, you will be helping them broaden their horizons. By helping your child explore their creativity, you are helping them discover more about themselves and how to better connect with the rest of the world.



 

About the Author:

Abby Holt

Abby says "I’ve always been crafty, impressing my classmates and teachers with the best school project posters, creating my own Halloween costumes, and using my calligraphy skills to make some extra cash in college. I have a knack for seeing something and being able to replicate it, plus I always enjoy a challenge. Fast forward to the present and I’m still crafty as ever and putting my craftability to good use.


She created the website Craftability to inspire you to put your own crafting abilities to good use, whether it’s painting, jewelry-making, quilting, or calligraphy.


Abby is not connected nor affiliated with Crooked Creek Art League or any of the links included in her article above.


 

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